LinkedIn Connects
Google's Faces of the Stranger: The Babysitter

Watching Ads: Job and Pastime

Given how we're all cramming as much ad-supported media through our skulls as we possibly can these days, you'd think the one thing we need a break from is advertising. Yet sheep that we are, we can't get enough of it. Consider this first story from ABC7.com:

When signing up for Brightspot, users fill out a personal profile and receive ads targeted to their interests. Brightspot co-founder Aaron Martins calls it a whole new way for people to interact with commercials... Brightspot pays users from 25-to-50-cents for watching and evaluating ads. The money can be applied for subscriptions to companies like Napster or Gamefly.

I've been on Brightspot for awhile now, and while the publishing partners haven't hooked me in yet, it's easy to see how people will get sucked in. You have to answer a few survey questions after each ad, which then disappear if you wait too long, so you can't click the ads and take a leisurely bathroom break.

Then there's this story from The New York Times:

For example, veryfunnyads.com, a broadband Web site operated by the TBS cable network, has delivered more than 63 million video clip views since its introduction last August...

The USA Network unit of NBC Universal, part of General Electric, also intends to climb aboard the pitch wagon celebrating advertising as entertainment with an online effort centered on brand-centric content.

Plans call for a Web site next year that would include commercials and movie trailers as well as features like social networking and tools that would let visitors make ads of their own. The site is tentatively named didja.com, as in “Didja see that?”

“It’s all about relevance,” said Chris McCumber, senior vice president for marketing and brand strategy at USA Network. “Consumers want to be entertained on their own time, on their own terms.”

The Times gets into the irony of these sites blossoming just as digital video recorders give us more power to skip the ads. Yet now you have these sites that are all about viewing ads, either for rewards or entertainment.

I'm just waiting for the brilliant minds that convince us to pay to watch ads.

Oh wait - from our attention spans to the money the ads help make us spend, we already do in full.

Comments